Needed: Someone who knows stuff about bikes


#1

My bike broke the other day, and since it sucks and I have some spare cash, instead of fixing it I’d like to buy a new one.

I’m looking for an old road bike that I could maybe turn into a single speed/fixie. Now, I know nothing about bikes. So searching through craigslist I just e mail anyone if the picture looks halfway decent.

I’m meeting with someone in about two hours to look at a bike I found that they want 125 for. Looking at the picture I’d pay maybe 35 dollars for it.

Below you will see the craigslist ad with the pictures. I was hoping that someone could tell me if it’s worth the price or things I should ask when i look at it or how to haggle the ■■■■ out of them.

Thanks guys.

The ad:

Men’s Nishiki Road Bike - $125
Date: 2010-06-22, 10:54AM MDT

Hello!

We are moving out of town and are selling a Men’s Nishiki Road Bike. The bike is in great condition and recently received new tires and cables. Only issue is that a friend borrowed the bike and somehow lost one of the bolts that holds the left pedal on. A very easy fix (just need to get a new bolt - picture below) but we’ve lowered the price in consideration of this. An excellent bike for a great price!!



#2

just tell it how it is. It’s an old bike with rust and corrosion. 125? more like 60 bucks. If it needs work even less. Don’t be afraid to be a dick cause it might work.


#3

That thing is probably not worth even 60. Looks to be in pretty poor condition.

What is your price range? I am sure I can give you some ideas and get you a fixed gear or single speed conversion for under 150 pretty easy.


#4

here is a fixie kind of cheap
http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product_10053…75_10000_200348

but you should be able to find something cheap at a thrift store or something


#5

hahahahah i just read ‘a friend borrowed the bike and somehow lost one of the bolts that holds the left pedal on’

how the hell do you even do that?

And again, keep scouring cl. I have had luck at thrift stores for old road bikes, as well as a lot of kids around here (not sure if its the same where you are)

but if you’re a :ph43r: and find a bike you’re in :wub: with you can walk by it like :whistle: and run away with it like :shifty:


#6

if you don’t know anything about bikes, you probably shouldnt start off with a single speed/fixed gear. i would just use it as is. you’ll probably be able to find better for your money


#7

craigslist sf bay area
tons of fixies


#8

Originally posted by stopPRE1236@Jun 24 2010, 03:16 PM
[b] here is a fixie kind of cheap
http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product_10053…75_10000_200348

but you should be able to find something cheap at a thrift store or something [/b]

I think you can do a conversion for a lot cheaper.


#9

I ended up talking them down to $60. I’m pretty happy with it. There is some rust on the frame, but it shifts fine and I found a bolt for the pedal already.

I do, however, want to convert it to a single speed and get some new tires for it. Any suggestions on where to start? I’m pretty new at this so any advice is great.

I spent 60 on the bike and don’t want to go over 200 total. If thats possible.


#10

single speed spacer/converter kit.


#11

Originally posted by Alex Adkinson@Jun 24 2010, 06:04 PM
single speed spacer/converter kit.

This and then look at a local bike shop for tires or something. They’re usually pretty cheap and plentiful (at least around here)

And it sounds like you didn’t do too bad. If it’s mechanically fine then I think you did well. And now you have some extra money to buy some hip clothes to ride on your fixie with


#12

make sure you always have a rubber band on your right leg if you wear jeans


#13

Originally posted by stopPRE1236@Jun 24 2010, 07:39 PM
make sure you always have a rubber band on your right leg if you wear jeans

Or wear skinny jeans!


#14

Just curious about why you are looking for a ss or a fixie. Ease of mainentance? Cool factor? Going to put bullhorn bars on it?

I’ve ridden and raced bikes for 20 years, and I love them in all shapes and makes. A simple lugged steel frame can feel sweet–raced my first triathlons on one of those.

I hope you’ll take the time to overhaul it, since that’s probably the best thing you can do (other than getting new tires): bottom bracket, headset (upper and lower bearing sets), and hubs. This bike is old enough not to have sealed bearings, and so you may be able to make it ride fairly well by renewing this way.


#15

After mulling it over on my 50 minute run, I concluded that I shall make restoring this bike back to pristine condition my summer project.

I think I’ll “overhaul it” like ORXCcoach said and do it all myself; making this bike the envy of the roads, while simultaneously grasping the intricate concepts of bicycle mechanics.

Have no fear, I will bump this thread accordingly.