Magness Moves On


#1

Going solo, apparently his contract with the Oregon Project was 2-years.

Looking for perhaps a team to merge with or . . . ?

Good Luck to him.

http://www.runblogrun.com/2012/07/magness-moves-on-by-jon-gugala-note-by-larry-eder.html


#2

He clearly has a ton of potential to coach a solid group of runners, it would be cool to see him run his own group.


#3

I believe his own group was his goal from the start, wasn’t it?


#4

This opinion is based upon what, exactly?


#5

There are quite a few coaches these days with absolutely no college coaching experience across the distance running landscape. None of them seems to have ever crossed back into college once they had some “success” with pros.


#6

I’ve chatted with him a few times. I think the whole “magness is obsessed with science” thing is overemphasized. Whenever we spoke of workouts/season structuring (and, ok, this was a couple years ago- but he was in grad school at the time) he made a lot of sense to me. A lot of common sense, standard-issue stuff, you know? Really the thing that set his stuff apart to me was his use of hill circuits, taken more or less right from Canova (which he freely explained and never tried to suggest it was his idea or anything groundbreaking, just that he found it useful).

I think when he writes for running magazines/tries to explain stuff/gives presentations, he forgets his audience doesn’t have graduate level education in exercise physiology, and so seems obsessed with the sciencey parts of things. I think it’s unnecessary for the general public, but at the same time, it’s the thing that sets him apart, and so it gets overemphasized.

In a similar vein, Jay Johnson has written/spoken at length about how he’s been stereotyped as the “plyo coach” as if that’s all he does. Yes, his runners do a lot of plyo/drills/body work stuff, but they also do the 100-110 miles a week and “real” workouts. However, all the “other” stuff gets emphasized. I think it’s similar with Magness.

Either way, I wish him the best of luck. He was always handy with a good word of advice if I was in a pickle, and most of it was simple, common sense stuff.


#7

I wonder if this will be a permanent break from Nike. I would think if he had his best interests in mind he would hope not. If you are going to start a new training group you would certainly want the most well financed investors on your side at least in some point in the future…


#8

I agree. Just because Magness rationalizes his approach to training through science does not mean he his overly obsessed with the role of science in training . Some coaches do fall into the trap of emphasizing science over logic in training (see: the V02max craze), but there’s nothing wrong with incorporating physiology into training as long as it is tempered with logic and experience.

From what I can tell from Magness’s academic and coaching work, he is a very intelligent and successful guy. Doesn’t hurt that a lot of his academic leanings are based on the work of Tim Noakes, a preeminent exercise physiologist.


#9

Jackie Areson leaving with him.

“Got this in the mail today, been dreaming of this day for too long. So relieved to be my own athlete.”

So does Magness start his own camp or join up with another established group?


#10

Feeling the hate.

He had some very good high school runners under him, and coached Areson. Finally he has worked his way into talking with the best minds in track, and from his blog shows that he is continuing to adapt his training based on others. He has got potential.


#11

Yes, because anyone who disagrees with you is a “hater”.

True, Magness had success with some high school kids. But, if we’re honest, getting good results from HS kids isn’t that hard.
He’s had one post-collegiate athlete run well [with pharmacological help, it should be noted - so maybe give some of the credit to Dr. Brown], yet horrendously when it mattered most.
As for “the best minds in track”, I’m going to give you the benefit of the doubt and assume you aren’t referring to Salazar.


#12

he clearly was referring to phil knight, not alberto.


#13

Your evidence being?


#14

I’m sure he meant Salazar has the best “help”:rolleyes:


#15

Thanks for the support guys.

Sorry, but none of my athletes have or will ever receive any “pharmacological” help. I love this sport too much to go down that route. Find something else to critique.

Just wanted to clear that up.


#16

“clear” that up? oh my :smiley:

Seriously though. Best of luck to you.


#17

Trying to remember you back in the day. If I remember right you had a cryptic name for your training cronies, but I have forgotten it. And I seem to recall an incident where you guys were able to get and drink a whole case of an energy drink at a meet at the University of Nebraska.


#18

Sorry dude, but non-therapeutic levothyroxine use counts. Or did you not have access to Alberto’s serious gourmet sh*t? That would be sad.


#19

Sorry dude, but get a clue. Jackie was never on non-therapeutic thyroid use.

Get a clue and realize she’s had a medically diagnosed thyroid issue since Tennessee before I even knew her.

Of course, I’m probably a drug pusher because I got diagnosed with Hashimoto’s when I was 14.

Get a new schtick man.


#20

Steve just to help me remember what was the name of your running team you used in national competition. Trying to remember is killing me