Endurance Running Is "Bad" For You


#1

True story, or at least that is what the media like to spin.

http://extremelongevity.net/wp-content/uploads/MCP-Jun12-OKeefe.pdf

Abstract:

[FONT=Berkeley-Book][SIZE=1]

[LEFT]A routine of regular exercise is highly effective for prevention and treatment of many common chronic diseases and
improves cardiovascular (CV) health and longevity. However, long-term excessive endurance exercise may induce
pathologic structural remodeling of the heart and large arteries. Emerging data suggest that chronic training for and
competing in extreme endurance events such as marathons, ultramarathons, ironman distance triathlons, and very long
distance bicycle races, can cause transient acute volume overload of the atria and right ventricle, with transient
reductions in right ventricular ejection fraction and elevations of cardiac biomarkers, all of which return to normal
within 1 week. Over months to years of repetitive injury, this process, in some individuals, may lead to patchy
myocardial fibrosis, particularly in the atria, interventricular septum, and right ventricle, creating a substrate for atrial
and ventricular arrhythmias. Additionally, long-term excessive sustained exercise may be associated with coronary
artery calcification, diastolic dysfunction, and large-artery wall stiffening. However, this concept is still hypothetical
and there is some inconsistency in the reported findings. Furthermore, lifelong vigorous exercisers generally have low
mortality rates and excellent functional capacity. Notwithstanding, the hypothesis that long-term excessive endurance
exercise may induce adverse CV remodeling warrants further investigation to identify at-risk individuals and formulate[/LEFT]
physical fitness regimens for conferring optimal CV health and longevity.
[/SIZE][/FONT]

So the real question is, if long distance endurance running (over 1 hour) is indeed “bad” for you, would you stop doing it?


#2

If someone told you that, ''Snapp’n Your Zippy" would cause you to go blind or grow hair on the palm of your hand, would you stop “Snapp’n Your Zippy?”

LOL, to the below data!:confused:

Emerging data suggest that chronic training for and
competing in extreme endurance events such as marathons, ultramarathons, ironman distance triathlons, and very long
distance bicycle races, can cause transient acute volume overload of the atria and right ventricle, with transient
reductions in right ventricular ejection fraction and elevations of cardiac biomarkers, all of which return to normal
within 1 week. Over months to years of repetitive injury, this process, in some individuals, may lead to patchy
myocardial fibrosis, particularly in the atria, interventricular septum, and right ventricle, creating a substrate for atrial
and ventricular arrhythmias. Additionally, long-term excessive sustained exercise may be associated with coronary
artery calcification, diastolic dysfunction, and large-artery wall stiffening. However, this concept is still hypothetical
and there is some inconsistency in the reported findings.


#3

It does not say it is bad for you:

“People who exercise regularly have markedly lower rates of disability
and a mean life expectancy that is 7 years longer than that of their
physically inactive contemporaries. However, a safe upper-dose limit
potentially exists, beyond which the adverse effects of exercise may
outweigh its benefits.”

I think the implication of the study is that if you stress your heart enough, there’s a chance it’ll be damaged.


#4

Am i the only one who read that with a bit of a “no ****” response? As far as I know, if you stress anything enough it might break. Then again, I’m no doctor.


#5

Time just posted this too, that’s about the fifth different place I’ve seen that. They’re recommending 10-15 miles a week max to obtain optimal benefit from running. Interesting I guess, but I don’t know if I buy it just based on one random study with some ‘inconsistencies’, definitely not going to start only running 1.5 miles a day because of it.


#6

It’s all relative. 10-15 mpw probably puts more strain on the average individuals body than 50 mpw does to me, or anyone else who’s been at it a while. If you’re running 60s and drop down to 30, you’re double ‘recommeneded’ but probably have obscene amounts of energy, far more than any average person running 15.