Chilean Miners


#1

http://images.zeit.de/gesellschaft/2010-10/fs-chile-bilder/18.jpg?ref=nf

You all been following this amazing story? All those miners are going to be pulled up to the surface in that contraption. 15 minutes or so at a shot. Gulp.


#2

Yeah, jeesh. In a capsule that is a mere 21 inches wide. Gulp.
Well, as someone pointed out, claustrophobia shouldn’t be a problem. If these guys were claustrophobic, they wouldn’t be miners.
I could never be a miner. They’d have to knock me out before putting me in the capsule (just imagine it getting stuck…).
Anyway, bravo to the brave, creative, hard-working folks who are getting them out (including some NASA experts, a super-driller from Denver who has emerged as a hero of the operation (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20101009/ap_on_bi_ge/lt_chile_mine_collapse_americans) and some other Americans), and of course to the miners for holding on so long and so courageously.


#3

Its a hole that is two times as deep as the empire state building is high. Kudos to everyone working on the rescue effort. But scheesch. I guess there will be two medics down there and they will be the last ones to come up. It would be terrible to have to be the last miner…


#4

[SIZE=3]Love that story, and my daughters have followed it closely, too.

Heard this morning that the guys were asking for toothpaste and shoe polish to be sent down so they could get gussied up to meet their loved ones again. I love that. Trapped underground for months and they still want to look good for their wives and kids.

One guy, though, probably wants to stay down there. I guess his wife was there holding vigil one day early on in the saga when, you guessed it, his girlfriend showed up as well and they got to meet each other for the first time. I’m betting that mine looks mighty good as a permanent home to that guy.
[/SIZE]


#5

maybe he can duck out the back door of the capsule…


#6

Ha! Apparently several of these guys were actually volunteering to be last – because they realized that the last one up will automatically have a place in the Guinness Book as the miner who had spent the longest time underground (alive), ever. And that might well pump up the value of book contracts, movie deals, etc., etc. …


#7

I can only imagine, Zat, what kind of shape these guys were in – personal hygiene-wise – after all those weeks in a hot, dusty mine with 32 other guys, no shower, and no (or few) changes of socks and underwear. …

Old Spice, anyone? :wink:


#8

The idea that the medics will be there made it a little easier to stomach for me. The idea that it would only be miners and that the last one would have to be there all alone, waiting fo the capsule to go up and then come back down again.

it would be a lonely time! :eek:


#9

No climbing towers or working in mines for me, came to my senses 30 years ago and stopped jumping out of perfectly sound airplanes too.

I have been following it and am in awe of the mental toughness of these guys.

I missed the wife and girlfriend story … the ladies have had plenty of time to cook up a punishment that might just drive him to ask to go back down.


#10

What’s the first thing you would want to eat (or drink, WiT), after more than two months of entombment on the following diet:

[INDENT]Tea and herbal infusions; energy shakes; yogurt and cereal shake; ham sandwiches; more yogurt, plus kiwi fruit; jam sandwiches.
[/INDENT]The men were NOT, incidentally, allowed one of the staples of the Chilean diet… beans. Given the confined spaces and all, it was thought that might have been, er, unwise.


#11

could have created a quite combustible situation, particularly if there were any smokers down there…


#12

Not sure what Id eat or drink but pretty sure Id ask Willie Nelson to roll me a really fat one from his private stash for the trip up.

edit: on second though I`d ask for two and give one to the guy with the wife and girlfriend waiting- then he would not give a damn about what awaits him:D


#13

My Metro train was stuck in a tunnel for a half-hour this morning and I started to get a tinge of claustrophobia. … No, mining is definitely not in my future.


#14

Its pretty marvelous tv. The New York Times has a live feed and seeing those miners come out of that improbably small tube in the ground is very moving. It is such a slow methodical process, but there is incredible release when they come out.

I don’t personally believe that I would do well shut up in a small cage in a black tunnel for eleven minutes. I would much rather be trapped with MoMo in the Washington DC subway system


#15

Best thing to do in that situation is just shut your eyes, then pray.


#16

Oakley is getting some nice exposure today since they supplied all the trapped miners with sunglasses.


#17

Ok, ZAT!! Here you goooo!! Number 21! The capsule is getting ready…to be lowered.

He will be met by his girlfriend.
If I was the wife…I’d leave too.

We’ve been following.


#18

So… was that the wife or the girlfriend?? He seemed to look at her kind of like, “Uh, you happy to see me?”


#19

This is from the NYTimes live feed:

All along, in the weeks since the miners were discovered alive and well in the refuge about half a mile below the earth’s surface, and video messages appeared, comparisons have been made to reality television. The miner who has just stepped into the rescue capsule,
Johnny Barrios, however, is about to return to what seems like a soap opera. Mr. Barrios, 50, is now being winched to the surface, where, as ABC News reports, a complex family situation awaits:

[INDENT]Chilean miner Johnny Barrios won’t be greeted by his wife of 28 years when he’s finally rescued today from the underground tomb where he’s been trapped for months. Marta Salinas, the 56-year-old wife of Barrios, won’t be glued to her television during his rescue, either. Salinas says she is not interested in the rescue of her husband after learning about his mistress, Susana Valenzuela, whom he had been seeing on the sly for years.
“I’m happy because he was saved. It’s a miracle from God. But I won’t attend the rescue,” Salinas told South American newspaper Clarin.
[/INDENT]


#20

“The 12th miner — Edison Peña, 34, known for running miles in the mine tunnels every day — stepped from the escape capsule to rapturous cheers and the embrace of his girlfriend, and then another from Mr. Piñera.”

from: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/14/world/americas/14chile.html?_r=1&hp

I found this interesting…obviously caloric conservation was not an issue once the small tunnels were bored. And much more upbeat the the wife/mistress soap opera.