800,000 Non-essential Federal Workers


#1

I can’t believe that we are reliving the 1995 government shutdown. That event created my favorite political moment of all time.

“800,000 non-essential federal workers” were sent home during the shutdown… and no one noticed! The country just went on as if nothing had changed. The worst thing that happened was that passports were delayed. Pick any other segment of our economy and send home 800,000 people from that group and I guarantee you the country would know it right away.

Now they are using the same 800,000 number again for this shutdown. I hope another shutdown occurs so some of you guys who don’t remember the first one can see how no one will notice they’re gone. I can’t think of a better demonstration to show the uselessness of bureaucratic bloat than these shutdowns.

Hint: When a company is going through tough times, who are the first people they cut? Non-essential personnel.


#2

This weekend is the biggest weekend for tourism in D.C. Thousands flock to the monuments, museums, and the cherry blossom festival. The cherry blossom festival will be canceled. Millions of dollars will be lost to hotels, taxi drivers, airlines, and food vendors.


#3

Unfortunately, the vast majority of the American public has never thought about more than “me, me, me” and they never will.


#4

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What would a shutdown mean?

Published: April 6 2011 19:35 | Last updated: April 6 2011 19:35

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SOCIAL SECURITY
A senior Obama administration official on Wednesday said current beneficiaries would continue to get their benefits. In 1995, during the last government shutdown, social security checks were paid. The Social Security administration retained nearly 5,000 employees during the initial phase to ensure that benefits were paid, although it furloughed more than 60,000 others.
If there is a government shutdown on Friday, most analysts believe something similar would happen. The government shutdown impacts discretionary spending, but Social Security falls under the rubric of mandatory spending and so does not need an appropriations bill to be distributed. And if the money is spent, then, like in the 1990s, the agency has legal authority to employ people to administer that money.
US MILITARY
The Office of Management and Budget sent instructions to every government department to prepare them for a shutdown, stating that employees engaged in military activities and law enforcement were to be retained. But the definition of what characterises military personnel is ambiguous.
Depending on where the line is drawn between non-essential and essential military personnel, some soldiers could go unpaid or partially paid until the situation is resolved.
“All military personnel will continue in normal duty status regardless of their affiliation with exempt or non-exempt activities,” says the draft planning guidance by the OMB. “Military personnel will serve without pay until such time as Congress makes appropriated funds available to compensate them for this period of service.”
A Pentagon spokesman has said that the armed forces would still have the ability to continue operations in Afghanistan, Iraq, Libya and Japan. In 1995, all military personnel were paid and reported for work.
But veterans will lose out. In 1995, they lost various services, from health care to welfare. More than 400,000 veterans had delays to their disability benefits and pension claims.
Payments through the GI Bill education grants were also stalled. This shutdown would not immediately have such a detrimental impact, as these benefits are paid at the beginning of the month. But the closure of veteran-related offices will hinder various processes, including medical appointments. Analysts predict that about two-thirds of the State Department and USAID staff in Washington would be furloughed.
TOURISM
Tourism will be hugely affected around the country in the event of a shutdown. A senior official said the annual cherry blossom parade in Washington would not occur as planned this weekend. In 1995, nearly 30,000 visa applications were left unprocessed and 200,000 applications for passports were ignored. A Congressional report found American tourist industries and airlines lost millions of dollars during the last government shutdown.
A shutdown would be mean the closure of national parks and monuments, who are staffed by workers deemed “non-essential” and given a furlough. That would have a significant effect on visitors and Americans – it is estimated that 300m people a year visit areas under the jurisdiction of the National Park Services, which is already slated for signification cuts in the federal budget.
During the shutdowns in 1995, more than 360 national parks closed. On top of this is the loss to the private sector, which relies on trade brought by national monuments and parks. Hundreds of thousands of private sector jobs around the US are reliant on business brought in by tourist attraction operated by the government which will be closed in the event of a shutdown. Particularly hard hit will be Washington DC, the nation’s capital and among its biggest tourist destinations, drawing 1.2m international visitors every year. In 1995, the complex of Smithsonian museums, which includes 16 institutions and the National Zoo were closed, and there it is assumed this would happen again, hitting surrounding businesses.
BUSINESS
The most serious impact on business will be lost revenues from activities bound up with closed government activities. But many companies with government contracts are worried about the prospect of delays or cancellations, with some updating their risk factors to take into account lost revenue. A senior official said new loan approvals by the Small Business Administration, and new home loan guarantee applications to the Federal Housing Administration, would not be processed, which could have an impact on the fragile property market and the economy. Tax audits would not occur, and the processing of refunds for paper-filed tax returns would be interrupted.
Another way business could be impacted is those that rely on regulatory agencies to approve their products. Agencies like the Food and Drug Administration, which reviews new drugs, would have their regulatory capacities reduced or stopped, hurting companies that are waiting for development stage drugs win approval. In the 1995 shutdowns, more than 20 per cent of Washington DC area contracts, or $3.7bn, were hit by the funding stall. The National Institute of Standards and Technology was not able to issue news standards for lights and lamps due to be effective in the middle of the shutdown, which caused delayed product deliveries and lost sales.


#5

It takes 800,000 people to hand out passports and run a few museums and parks?

I will personally submit a quote to the federal government to perform all those tasks at 1/10th the current cost, and I would make a huge amount of money doing it, and the government would make more back in taxes from me than they were paying me.

If the shutdown occurs, none of you will notice any change at all.


#6

You know nothing of my employment/can not tell me I wont notice any change.


#7

Well, if you’re telling me that you’re one of the 800,000 non-essential workers, then the only change you’ll notice is that you’ll get a fully paid 2 week vacation.


#8

DG, you are unbelievably naive. Non-essential basically means they don’t have an imminent national security role. There are plenty of people being sent home who keep our country safe and running in the long run but are not essential during a (hopefully) short government shutdown.

You’re right, most people won’t notice if they’re gone for a little while. They get holidays off and no one notices. But if it builds up to a few weeks or a month, everyone will notice.


#9

The people who keep us safe are “essential personnel”. They won’t be sent home.

But you bring up a good question. How long could the 800,000 non-essential government workers be gone before they start to feel the effects in Peoria? I say never.


#10

My mom’s company may not get paid in time for services performed for various federal agencies.


#11

First, not sure how “safe” they really keep us. Second, very interested in how many non-essential military there are in an immensely bloated pentagon. I’d wager in real terms just as many as in the government at large. But can’t voice that, gotta support the troops.


#12

I’m a veteran and need to go to the doctor, pay for school, etc.
Still want to make that guarantee?


#13

A lengthy government shutdown could put a halt to some of the basic functions of Wall Street. New issues of bonds and stocks could be held up during a government shutdown, since they often require registration with regulators. Initial public offerings may be impossible. Mergers could be brought to a standstill, since they often require the approval of a number of regulatory bodies.
The Securities and Exchange Commission says that while certain enforcement and market surveillance activities will continue, it will have to stop performing many of its functions in the event of a shutdown.
The frozen functions could include the registration of securities, accepting and publishing corporate filings, and processing filings related to mergers and acquisitions. The agency’s plan for exactly which functions will continue hasn’t yet been finalized.
The Federal Trade Commission and the Department of Justice are both charged with reviewing mergers and acquisitions to prevent deals that would be anti-competitive. Those reviews may be stalled in the event of a government shutdown.

RELATED LINKS

Current DateTime: 01:21:39 07 Apr 2011
LinksList Documentid: 42478583

[LIST]
[]What Happens if Government Shuts Down?
[
]Big Risks for Both Parties
[*]States Fear Local Effects[/LIST]

It’s not clear whether the FTC or the Department of Justice would be able to accept filings for new deals. While both agencies will be able to perform some of their functions, the fate of the merger reviews is not yet known.
One part of the regulatory apparatus that won’t shut down is the Federal Reserve. It doesn’t rely on Congressional funds and plans to remain open for business as usual. This means that bank regulatory work continues.
The last government shut down lasted three weeks. If Wall Street were unable to perform many of its functions for weeks, it could impact revenues this quarter.
When the government shut down in 1995, the impact was not as severe because the SEC was able to continue to function because it located funds to pay employees. An SEC spokesman told the Wall Street Journal that option is not available this time.


#14

Yup. Guaranteed.

So far we have two people worried about getting money or benefits from the federal government. Anyone see a pattern here?

Kreme posted about how the government won’t be there regulate private enterprise. Good. Get them out of the way and let’s see what happens.

800,000 non-essential federal workers.

800,000 non-essential federal workers.

800,000 NON-ESSENTIAL federal workers.

100,000 + 100,000 + 100,000 + 100,000 + 100,000 + 100,000 + 100,000 + 100,000 non-essential federal workers

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1,000 + 1,000 + 1,000 + 1,000 + 1,000 + 1,000 + 1,000 + 1,000 + 1,000 + 1,000 + 1,000 …

non-essential … federal … workers


#15

I’m a little surprised you’re not supportive of contracts and the rule of law (I say a little because I then remember you’re nothing but a fuck-'tard troll).


#16

The population of Washington DC is 600,000.

We have 800,000 non-essential federal workers.

Where are the other 200,000?


#17

One in 375 Americans is a non-essential federal worker.


#18

-_-


#19

Bump

All posts like this do is reveal your Glenn Beck-likeness; unwilling to engage in dialogue, picks and chooses ideologies at will, changes topics when someone attempts to bring up the hypocrisy of your own beliefs.


#20

800,000 non-essential government workers.

33% of Americans now get money from the federal government. That’s over 100,000,000 . Won’t it be great when we ALL get money from the federal government? We can ALL stick it to the man.